A New Way to Translate Elementor Pages With WPML

We have long recommended WPML as a great way to translate WordPress pages. Now, the WPML team have released a substantial update, allowing users to translate Elementor pages and posts in a much easier way than ever before.

WPML is one of the most popular translation plugins and has been around since 2009. In fact, it’s one of the most popular commercial plugins as well, with over 400,000 WordPress sites using it to translate their content.

In its latest feature release, WPML has released a page builder addon, allowing users to translate the entire page they’ve made in Elementor, including all of its elements, from a single and convenient editor. You can read more about this, with step by step instructions, in WPML’s release post

How to Translate Widgets with WPML

It has now become extremely easy to translate pages with WPML, because you can freely add text to any text widget, and then translate it in the WPML editor. After you finish crafting the entire page, all the widget texts will automatically appear in WPML’s Translation Editor.

  1. Step 1: Create your page. You can use any of the following widgets: Heading, Text Editor, Video, Button, Icon, Price List, Price Table, Flip Box, Slides, Image Box, Icon Box, Icon List, Counter, Progress Bar, Testimonial, Tabs, Accordion, Toggle, Alert, HTML & Form.
  2. Step 2: Go to the page dashboard and click on the plus icon next to Translate in the WPML box.
  3. Step 3: In the translation editor, add your translation to each of the widgets.  be sure to check the box to indicate the translation is complete.
  4. Step 4: Once the translation for all the widgets is complete, the translation bar will show 100% complete. Now you can click on ‘Save and close’.

You should now be sent back to the dashboard, with the page, including all widgets, translated with WPML.

Translate Elementor

Outsourcing the translation process

You can also outsource the translation of the Elementor page using WPML’s translation management. After you add the page to the Translation Basket, you’ll be able to choose the translator that the page will be sent to.

That translator will have access to the same translation editor described earlier. Once the translator finishes the job, the page will be available on the site.

Translate Elementor Pages With WPML

Updating a translated page

After you update a page you have already translated, an update icon will appear in the WPML box in the dashboard of the page, notifying you the translation needs updating. Inside the translation editor, you will see the new heading text and will be able to add the proper translation to it.

Translation for updates

 Automatically translate Elementor links with WPML

Almost every Elementor widget contains links. Buttons, Icon box, Images, Tabs and so on… Now, when you add links to any of Elementor’s widgets, WPML automatically updates the links in the translated versions to make them point to translated content.

WPML stated that they are working on adding the option to translate texts that come from image widgets, as well as other new features coming up.

Conclusion

According to Google Analytics from Elementor.com, approximately 56% of our audience are English speakers. Moreover, English speaking users should also consider creating multilingual sites, in order to reach a broader global audience.

These users can greatly benefit from WPML’s latest update. We have gotten a lot of questions about creating multilingual websites with Elementor, so I am sure this updates will be appreciated. I’d like to thank the entire WPML team for significantly upgrading the process of translating Elementor content.

I think this update says something about the way in which page builders have recently become a crucial element in every WordPress website. We are happy to continue to lead the cause of making web design fun and intuitive in WordPress.

If you are looking for free translation plugins that work with Elementor, I suggest you try TranslatePress and Polylang.

One final related note. If you speak a foreign language, this is a great chance to contribute to the Elementor project and add an online translation to our page builder.

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About the Author

Ben Pines
Ben Pines
Ben Pines is Elementor's CMO. He has been in the online marketing industry for over 10 years, specializing in content marketing. WordPress has been Ben's platform of choice since the time it was used solely for blogging.

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Comments

26 Responses

  1. I’ve been using WPML for 5 years since I started building with WordPress. It is a great plugin, so very pleased that working in conjunction with Elementor it completes the package

  2. Because I was wordpress novice, read a lot of wpml article feel pretty good, but the primary still do not understand, elementor can only have this way to translate it? If you want to set up more languages!

  3. “…allowing users to translate the entire page they’ve made in Elementor, including all of its elements…”

    That is not entirely true is it? Both global widget as well as animated widgets are not translated at all.

  4. I don’t see a translation for the video widget URL. Though it’s a special case, video’s can be language specific (voiceover, subtitles) and thus can have different URL’s.

  5. You mentioned “heading” but Is the “section heading” widget translatable as well ? Doesn’t seem to be for me.

  6. what if I want different style for my language. I mean different template for each language. I tried to make single template for my pods and translate it but in front-end it’s not change base on selected language. any idea?

  7. Hello..

    There is a problem wpml translating multi-lingual templates when using the Astra theme. So when I modify the template of the languages added, the design of the template disappears until I return to save and publish the mother tongue of the template, where everything goes back to its nature .. Why does that happen ..?

  8. Hello..

    I’m making multilingual website using Elementor+ACF+WPML. I make a frontpage template with Elementor, where I’m use ACF with dynamic field Elementor feature.
    I don’t want to use WPML translation feature for Elementor because it breaks the template logic. WPML creates different pages with different Elementor layouts for each language. When I need to correct design I should do this on each page.
    That’s why I use ACF. I did page markup with Elementor and its’ dynamic feature, and then fill the fields with the native WordPress editing mode, for each translation.

    The question is: How is the translation while maintaining this connection between the ACF and My template in Elementor ..?

    1. Hey Ayman, I think I can relate to you. Not even using ACF tho and having trouble with Elementor Templates too… I’m no expert using WPML, but I think it’s messing up with the Elementor Templates, without even going further (as in your case with ACF)… Somehow I tried to make another language versions of everything for a custom “single” template I am making (with specific conditions) and besides being painful (we should be allowed to skip WPML on these type of things, I get the conditions is a bit of a “shady” zone as things like categories, tags and other elements need to be translated though)…

      But i

  9. OMG, at first glance, a serious mess with Elementor custom templates 🙁 … Does it have to be so complicated (WPML side)… Having to delve into language version for custom templates, and for display conditions… Seems like connections are not being properly made..?

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